Nurturing Nature bumblebee and solitary bee boxes used by Kew Gardens

June 30, 2016

in Bumblebees and their ecology, Gardening For Wildlife, Red mason solitary bees, Solitary Bee Observation Box

Kew Gardens take possession of award winning wild bee nest boxes

Nurturing Nature Bumblebee nest boxes formed part of the huge and impressive “Hive”  as well as being used elsewhere at Kew for bumblebee research by Dr. Hauke Koch ” The bumblebee boxes worked well although the wet weather did not help the bumblebees!”

Bumblebee nest boxes used at Kew Gardens being examined by Dr. Koch

Bumblebee nest boxes used at Kew Gardens being examined by Dr. Koch

“The solitary bee observation nest boxes by Nurturing Nature are a fantastic addition to our Pollinator Trail at Kew Gardens. They were quickly accepted by red mason bees. Our visitors have been absolutely fascinated by the larvae developing inside the brood chambers, something most people have never before seen in their lives.”

Nurturing Nature solitary bee nest boxes at Kew Gardens with Dr. Koch

Nurturing Nature solitary bee nest boxes at Kew Gardens with Dr. Koch

I was lucky enough to meet, chat with and have coffee with some of the staff, then have a tour behind the scenes at the bumblebee laboratory, which I found ever so interesting, where Dr. Koch told me and showed me what he was up to with regards to bumblebee research. Fascinating.

High rise bumblebee apartments at Kew!

High rise bumblebee apartments at Kew!

I can absolutely recommend visiting Kew Gardens, and explore the world’s most famous botanic gardens, with 350 acres of beautiful gardens, tranquillity and minutes from central London! Did you know they employ 250 scientists or that,

” The first royal residents were George II, his wife Queen Caroline and their ever-growing family. However, Kew Palace will always be associated with the ‘madness’ of George III. The palace was purchased by the Georgian King as an annex to the White House (which sadly no longer stands) to accommodate his expanding family, and somewhere for George III to be shut away during his infamous episodes of ‘madness’. Come and decide for yourself if the King really was mad”.

With thanks to Lz Young for above photo.

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